brainroads-toward-tomorrows mental patterns

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The World is Full of Options

 

By Peter Drucker

From Stuck in Halftime by Bob Buford

 

There are two versions on this page: the original and an enhanced version on steroids+++

Please see Post-Capitalist Executive first.
It and the links on it provide
a valuable foundation for this page.

 

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!!!!!!!!!!! Awareness !!!!!!!!!!!

Original (tame) version in easy reading format

In a few hundred years, when the history of our time is written from a long-term perspective, I think it very probable that the most important event those historians will remember is not technology, not the Internet, not e-commerce—but the unprecedented change in the human condition.

For the first time—and I mean that literally—substantial and rapidly growing numbers of people have choices.

For the first time, people have had to manage themselves.


And we are totally unprepared for it.


Up until around 1900, even in the most highly developed countries, the overwhelming majority of people simply followed in their father’s footsteps—if they were lucky.

If your father was a peasant farmer, you were a peasant farmer.

If he was a craftsman, you were a craftsman.

There was no such thing as upward mobility.


Now, suddenly, a large number of people choose what they want to be.

And what’s more, they have more than one career.

The average working life span is now close to sixty years.

In 1900, it was twenty.


In a short time, we will no longer believe that retirement means the end of working life.

Retirement may even come much earlier than ever, but working life will continue if only out of economic necessity.

For many, however, working well beyond retirement will be a choice based on preference.

They will either tire of luxury or desire to use their knowledge and experience to contribute to society.


Even during their now traditional thirty- to forty-year working lives, most people have options that never existed for their parents, and they exercise those options several times.

When I talk to the people in my executive management program (successful people who are forty-five years old on average, sixty percent of whom are in the business sector, forty percent in nonbusiness), everyone says, “I do not expect to end my career where I am working now.”


To take advantage of this unprecedented age of options, we need to learn who we are.

We don’t know.

When I ask my students, “Do you know what you’re good at?” almost no one knows.

“Do you know what you need to learn to get the full benefit of your strengths?”

Not one of them has even asked that question.


Few people know where they belong, what kind of temperament they have, or what kind of person they are.

“Do I work well with people or am I a loner?”

“What are my values?”

“What am I committed to?”

“Where do I belong?”

“What is my contribution?”


Many people intuitively know the answers to these questions, but because they do not work through them systematically, they often sell themselves short.

So we find ourselves in an unprecedented place:

The most educated people in history, with a world full of options for meaningful work, and yet unsure of just where we belong.


Those who want to live a fulfilling life—who want to feel as if there is some purpose in their being on this earth—will have to learn to manage themselves.

They will have to accept the fact that it is their own responsibility to find meaningful work that builds on their strengths and values.


As this happens, I believe more and more people will look to the social sector — volunteer organizations like the church, education, community services, and so on — for either a new career or one that parallels a current position.

This is the one place where the knowledgeable worker in an organization can actually discover who he or she is and can learn to manage him or herself.


Bob Buford has done a great service in his first book, Halftime, by showing people how to explore this wonderful world of options.

In this book he offers encouragement and motivation for those who have begun to seek their “Second Half career” but are not quite there … yet.

 

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The following ↓ is a condensed strategic brainscape that can be explored and modified to fit a user’s needs

 

The concepts and links below ↓ are …

major foundations ↓ for future directed decisionS

aimed at navigating

a world constantly moving toward unimagined futureS

history-of-the-world-in-two-hours-03-pict-600

YouTube: The History of the World in Two Hours
— beginning with the industrial revolution ↑ ↓

radar_limited-pict-no-reflect-400

We can only work on the thingS on our mental radar at a point in time

About time The future that has already happened

radar-differences-pict-400

The economic and social health of our world
depends on
our capacity to navigate unimagined futureS
(and not be prisoners of the past)

The assumption that tomorrow is going to be
an extrapolation of yesterday sabotages the future — an
organization’s, a community’s and a nation’s future.

The future is unpredictable and that means
it ain’t going to be like today
(which was designed yesterday)

The capacity to navigate is governed by what’s between our ears ↓

 

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When we are involved in doing something ↑

it is extremely difficult to navigate

and very easy to become a prisoner of the past.

We need to maintain a pre-thought ↓

systematic approach to work and work approach

Click on either side of the image below to see a larger view

Harvest to action

Harvesting and implementing Work

based on reality

the non-linearity of time and events

and the unpredictability of the future

with its unimagined natureS. ↓ ↑

(It’s just a matter of time before we can’t get to the future
from where we are presently
)

larger view

foundations-and-opportunities-2016-pict-400

Intelligence and behavior ↑ ↓ ← Niccolò Machiavelli ↑ ↓

Political ecologists believe that the traditional disciplines define fairly narrow and limited tools rather than meaningful and self-contained areas of knowledge, action, and eventscontinue

❡ ❡ ❡

Foundational ↑ Books → The Lessons of History — unfolding realities (the need for a political and social theory and toward a theory of organizations) ::: The Essential Drucker — your horizons? ::: Textbook of Wisdom — conceptual vision and imagination tools ::: The Daily Drucker — conceptual breadth ::: Management Cases (Revised Edition) see chapter titles for examples of “named” situations …

foundational-books-cropped-pict-600

What do these ideas, concepts, horizons mean for me? continue

 

Exploration paths → The memo they don’t want you to see ::: Peter Drucker — top of the food chain ::: Work life foundations (links to Managing Oneself) ::: A century of social transformation ::: Post-capitalist executive ::: Allocating your life ::: What executives should remember ::: What makes an effective executive? ::: Innovation ::: Drucker’s “Time” and “Toward tomorrowS” books ::: Concepts (a WIP) ::: Site map a.k.a. brainscape, thoughtscape, timescape

 

Just reading ↑ is not enough, harvesting and action thinking are neededcontinue

Information ↑ is not enough, thinking ↓ is neededfirst then next

thinking-principles-taskcard-400

Larger view of thinking principles ↑ Text version ↑ :::
Always be constructiveWhat additional thinking is needed?

 

Initially and absolutely needed: the willingness and capacity to
regularly look outside of current mental involvements continue

 

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The following is a link and graphically enhanced version by bobembry.

The purpose of the enhancement is to encourage you to slow down and explore the real world meaning/implications of each radar blip in what he is saying. The original can be found at the top of the page.

 

In a few hundred years, when the history of our time is written from a long-term perspective, I think it very probable that the most important event those historians will remember is not technology, not the Internet, not e-commerce—but the unprecedented change in the human condition.

movies in time movies in time

For the first time—and I mean that literally—substantial and rapidly growing numbers of people have choices.

For the first time, people have had to manage themselves.

managing oneself

Larger

Larger thinking canvas (see below)

Dense reading and Dense listening ::: Thinking broad and Thinking detailed


And we are totally unprepared for it.


Up until around 1900, even in the most highly developed countries, the overwhelming majority of people simply followed in their father's footsteps—if they were lucky.

movies in time movies in time

If your father was a peasant farmer, you were a peasant farmer.

If he was a craftsman, you were a craftsman.

There was no such thing as upward mobility.


Now, suddenly, a large number of people choose what they want to be.

And what's more, they have more than one career.

The average working life span is now close to sixty years.

In 1900, it was twenty.


In a short time, we will no longer believe that retirement means the end of working life.

Retirement may even come much earlier than ever, but working life will continue if only out of economic necessity.

For many, however, working well beyond retirement will be a choice based on preference.

They will either tire of luxury or desire to use their knowledge and experience to contribute to society.

Knowledge: Its Economics and Its Productivity

(See what do you want to be remembered for? (beware of good intentions) and Post-Capitalist Society)


Even during their now traditional thirty- to forty-year working lives, most people have options that never existed for their parents, and they exercise those options several times.

When I talk to the people in my executive management program (successful people who are forty-five years old on average, sixty percent of whom are in the business sector, forty percent in nonbusiness), everyone says, “I do not expect to end my career where I am working now.” (implications for top management?)


To take advantage of this unprecedented age of options

we need to learn

(not school learning — but learning that becomes a part of you)

who we are

We don't know

When I ask my students, “Do you know what you’re good at?” almost no one knows. (calendarize this?)

Notice he didn’t say knowledge specialty. See taking on assignments

 

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Elements of a work approach

I (bobembry) suggest you create a thinking canvas for each of his questions and regularly update them throughout your life.

Larger

start-up

Larger

tag structure

Larger

thinking canvas system

Wall chart: radar blips to consider

 

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Do you know what you need to learn to get the full benefit of your strengths?(calendarize this?)

Not one of them has even asked that question.

Again he's not talking about knowledge specialty, but that may be something you have to learn so you can employ your strengths.

knowledge technology

Larger

Economic content & structure, money flows, efforts, and consumer lives


Few people know where they belong, what kind of temperament they have, or what kind of person they are.

“Do I work well with people or am I a loner?” (calendarize this?)

“What are my values?” (calendarize this?)

“What am I committed to?” (calendarize this?)

Where do I belong?” (calendarize this?)

“What is my contribution?” (calendarize this?)


Many people intuitively know the answers to these questions, but because they do not work through them systematically, they often sell themselves short.

So we find ourselves in an unprecedented place: The most educated people in history, with a world full of options for meaningful work, and yet unsure of just where we belong. (calendarize “What is meaningful work?”)


Those who want to live a fulfilling life—who want to feel as if there is some purpose in their being on this earth—will have to learn to manage themselves.

They will have to accept the fact that it is their own responsibility to find meaningful work (he did't say job) that builds on their strengths and values. (calendarize this?)

Foundations for future directed decisions

bbx Post-capitalist society ::: the transformation

bbx Managing in the Next Society

bbx Peter's Principles

bbx From Analysis to Perception — The New Worldview

bbx See The Five Most Important Questions You Will Ever Ask About Your Nonprofit Organization and Managing the Nonprofit Organization for clues to meaningful work

bbx Josh Abrams and self-development summary

bbx How to guarantee non-performance and

bbx What results should you expect? — a user’s guide to MBO

bbx Carefully choosing your nonprofit affiliations

Look here

bbx What do you want to be remembered for?


As this happens, I believe more and more people will look to the social sector—volunteer organizations like the church, education, community services, and so on—for either a new career or one that parallels a current position.

This is the one place where the knowledgeable worker in an organization can actually discover who he or she is and can learn to manage him or herself.

Larger

Man oneself Living

Living in More Than One World:
How Peter Drucker’s Wisdom Can Inspire Your Life
by Bruce Rosenstein

managing volunteers

Larger

Mission

 


 

Bob Buford has done a great service in his first book, Halftime, by showing people how to explore this wonderful world of options.

In this book he offers encouragement and motivation for those who have begun to seek their “Second Half career” but are not quite there … yet.

 

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Half Time series

buford books

Amazon

             

Amazon links (work-around for browser ad blocking)

 

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Career / life vision guidance from Peter Drucker + — extremely, extremely, extremely valuable attention-directing concepts and ideas from a long-term standpoint.

knowledge technologies management industries

Larger

Larger

PISCO-TEC

Career and Life Guidance from Peter Drucker
is attention-directing work

 

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Peter Drucker: Conceptual Resources

The Über Mentor

A political / social ecologist
a different way of seeing and thinking about
the big picture
— lead to his top-of-the-food-chain reputation

drucker business week

about Management (a shock to the system)

 

“I am not a ‘theoretician’; through my consulting practice I am in daily touch with the concrete opportunities and problems of a fairly large number of institutions, foremost among them businesses but also hospitals, government agencies and public-service institutions such as museums and universities.

And I am working with such institutions on several continents: North America, including Canada and Mexico; Latin America; Europe; Japan and South East Asia.” — PFD

 

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List of his books

 

Large combined outline of Drucker’s books — useful for topic searching.

 

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High tech is living in the nineteenth century,
the pre-management world.
They believe that people pay for technology.
They have a romance with technology.
But people don't pay for technology:
they pay for what they get out of technology.” —
The Frontiers of Management

Keywords: tlnkwoptions

 

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“The greatest danger in times of turbulence is not turbulence; it is to act with yesterday’s logic”. — Peter Drucker


The shift from manual workers who do as they are being told — either by the task or by the boss — to knowledge workers who have to manage themselves ↓ profoundly challenges social structure

Managing Oneself is a REVOLUTION in human affairs.” … “It also requires an almost 180-degree change in the knowledge workers’ thoughts and actions from what most of us—even of the younger generation—still take for granted as the way to think and the way to act.” …

… “Managing Oneself is based on the very opposite realities: Workers are likely to outlive organizations (and therefore, employers can’t be depended on for designing your life), and the knowledge worker has mobility.” ← in a context

 

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These pages are attention directing tools for navigating a world moving toward unimagined futures.

It’s up to you to figure out what to harvest and calendarize
working something out in time (1915, 1940, 1970 … 2040 … the outer limit of your concern)nobody is going to do it for you.

It may be a step forward to actively reject something (rather than just passively ignoring) and then figure out a coping plan for what you’ve rejected.

Your future is between your ears and our future is between our collective ears — it can’t be otherwise. A site exploration starting point

 

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